Shawn Hochman, PhD

Professor and Interim Chair

Emory University School of Medicine

Office: Whitehead Bldg

Phone: 404-712-3131

Email: shawn.hochman@emory.edu

Additional Contact Information

Mailing Address:

Physiology Department

615 Michael Street
Suite 601

Atlanta, GA 30322-3110

Additional Websites

Biography

Education: 

Interim Chair, Dept. Physiology, Emory University     2016 -

Deputy Chair, Dept. Physiology, Emory University     2014 -2016

Professor, Dept. Physiology, Emory University          2012

Associate Professor,   Emory University                    2003 - 2012

Assistant Professor,    Emory University                    1999 –2003    

Assistant Professor,    University of Manitoba           1995-1999      

Research Associate    University of Manitoba           1993-1995      

Post-doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto              1990-1993

Ph.D., University of Manitoba, Canada                      1989

Interim Chair, Dept. Physiology, Emory University             09/2016 -

Deputy Chair, Dept. Physiology, Emory University             09/2014 -2016

Professor, Dept. Physiology, Emory University                      09/2012

Director, Neuroscience Graduate Program                  05/2012 - 2015

Associate Professor,   Emory University                    09/2003 - 2012

Assistant Professor,    Emory University                    08/1999 – 09/2003    

Assistant Professor,    University of Manitoba           04/1995-08/1999      

Research Associate    University of Manitoba           07/1993-03/1995      

Research Associate    University of Manitoba           06/1989-07/1990

Research

Overall research has embraced studies on spinal circuit function with emphasis on neuromodulation-based plasticity via biogenic amine modulators (serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine, the trace amines, ACh). These modulators have been linked to activation of the spinal circuitry generating locomotion, control of autonomic NS function, as well as the potent inhibition of sensory systems.

Most recently we developed enabling technical approaches that include hybrids between in vitro and in vivo mammalian model systems, multi-electrode arrays, and preclinical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) studies.

Current emphases are on the importance of sensory afferents and autonomic efferents in dictating CNS function and dysfunction. Associated projects are:

1. Understanding the origin of variability in experimental outcome in animal research that hinders clinical translation. We developed technologies for near-continuous home-cage capture of physio-behavioral variables and are characterizing emergent changes in physio-behavioral variables including after cord injury. We hope to uncover predictors of disease emergence and provide real-time ‘smart’ feedback-based modulation of behavior in the home-cage.

2. In vitro adult mouse model to dissect modulatory mechanisms of epidural spinal cord stimulation (SCS). In collaboration with Boston Scientific, we developed a paradigm to fast-track translationally-relevant preclinical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) studies. We are currently exploring recruitment principles and SCS-induced modulation of putative neuropathic pain-encoding spontaneous activity.

3. Injury-Induced dysautonomia via plasticity in thoracic chain ganglia. Thoracic paravertebral sympathetic chain ganglia control vasomotor function in trunk and upper extremities but have been inaccessible for in vivo study. We developed an ex vivo adult mouse preparation, obtained the first whole cell recordings of their synaptic and cellular properties, and incorporate optogenetic and interleaved computational modeling to understand autonomic plasticity after cord injury

4. Plasticity in normally non-pain encoding Aδ- and C-LTMR sensory afferents after spinal cord injury. Combine development of novel in vitro skin-nerve models and optogenetics to characterize plasticity in afferent fiber encoding following injury. 

Publications